About Stuff

WELCOME to our new and improving travel blog!  Having recently made the shift from Blogger to WordPress, I am still working out the numerous kinks and quirks of designing a site.  Thanks in advance for bearing with me.

This is the section in which we talk about ourselves.

Scott and Kenda

Scott and Kenda

Click here to read the abridged version of our saga.

Click here to read the unabridged version of our saga.

2 Comments:

  1. I too have had exactly what you had… I used to be a runner and very active… I am 3 months out from surgery, and very frustrated. I can walk, but limp, puts strain on basck, knees hurt etc… the part across the top of my foot closest to my ankle is what is preventing me from walking, very little range of motion. PT twice week, and very painful work at removing scar tissue. I am very impressed with your blog, and your determination. I am taking a vitamin D, Magnesium/calcium supplement, I believe is helping, and wearing a compression sock. I am 61 but still active, any words of encouragement. Oh, I was At a lake in Idaho, went down a path wearing wedged flip flops.. took a round rock, and down I went.. A 7 hr. drive home with ankle not set was quite an experience.

    • Hi Barb,
      Thank you for writing in. I feel your angst! Do you happen to have a syndesmosis screws still in your foot? If so, when they remove that (should be at 12 weeks) range of motion increases. Also, I went heavily into probiotics to remove that scar tissue – it was a big hindrance to my happiness. If you take probiotics on an empty stomach, they tend to work more systemically. Be sure to get the probiotics that are good, though, not the kind you get at CVS. I got some cheap ones at first and found myself feel nauseous. Go more towards the health food store type.

      But mostly, it’s simply a long healing process. Nerves, muscles, tendons, they’re all healing and trying to reorganize themselves in your body. Inflammation is high, so try to eat a whole foods, low acidic diet to help your body. I’m vegan, so my diet is naturally low in acidity. There are certain foods that help fight inflammation- even turmeric is good for that. I was making cocktails (that tasted horrible) with different spices and herbs.

      Hang in there. Keep up the PT, do all your exercises at home, too. If you can, get some acupuncture and massage therapy and even chiropractic on that ankle. I had my talus adjusted several times (when it was ready – I was nearly a year out before the talus adjustment), and it felt great afterwards. But only do that with a chiropractor who is experienced with that specific adjustment. It’s been a journey, and within a year, I felt like a new woman.

      Keep writing in, if you feel like it, and let me know how your progress goes. Remember that the changes are incremental, and try try try to note all the positive changes you experience. I found when I focused only on the stuff that wasn’t working, I got depressed. I also stayed away from all the online stuff that was negative. Too many folks out there who use the web as a forum for being a victim instead of a survivor. But when I shifted that focus to the good things, life was easier. It’s also hard, because folks who never had this injury really have no idea how challenging it is. It’s not a typical broken bone. These bones are some of the very most important in your body – they hold you up, they keep you balanced, they stabilize you. You will get better! I’ll send some healing thoughts your way.

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