No Clever Title for Richfield, Utah

Richfield was an ordinary place. So much so that I’m at a loss to come up with a clever title for this post. But but but the drive to Richfield, now that was something to blog home about. It was one of the finest on this journey.

Moab to Richfield

Landscape
Much of the drive looked something like this.

Passing through Hanksville we stopped and checked out the cool and quirky Kiteley’s Place.

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Moments later at the junction of 24 and 95, we found ourselves at the Hollow Mountain Gas Station in Hanksville. I walked into the convenience store to find the bathroom. The entire joint is carved out of the mountain, rock, it’s just a big rock hill, really. Not only is it nice and cool in there, but you a giant section of rock is jutting out into the terlet area.

Hollow Mountain
And we saw landscapes that looked like this:

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Capitol Reef National Park

In Torrey, we stopped at Capitol Reef National Park to check out the red red rocks and the petroglyphs of the Fremont people found along 24 in the Fruita Rural Historic District area. Learn more about Capitol Reef here.

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Panorama Point, also part of the Capitol Reef National Park is absolutely worth the stop, and a hike around the Chimney Rock trail as well. One section is strenuous. Bring water.

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Capitol Reef National Park

Lodging
We stayed at the Best Western Richfield Inn. It was clean enough, cheap enough, dog-friendly enough and comfy enough. What more can I say? It was a Best Western in a hot, Hot HOt HOT small town. I looked out the window and saw the Subway Sandwich shop where we bought our dinner. The gray skies, the gray macadam, and the gray horizon all made for a gray memory of a just passin’ through kind of place.

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There is nothing so American as our national parks. The scenery and wildlife are native. The fundamental idea behind the parks is native. The parks stand as the outward symbol of this great human principle.
~ Franklin D. Roosevelt

The establishment of the National Park Service is justified by considerations of good administration, of the value of natural beauty as a National asset, and of the effectiveness of outdoor life and recreation in the production of good citizenship.
~Theodore Roosevelt

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Our Journey West Across the US

Post #1: Macon Music in Georgia
Post #2: Boy from Tupelo, Mississippi
Post #3: Two Must-Sees in Memphis Tennessee
Post #4: Mosey Through the Arkansas Ozarks
Post #5: Gettin’ Our Kicks on Route 66 from Missouri to Sapulpa, Oklahoma
Post #6: More Route 66 Kicks from Sapulpa to Oklahoma City
Post #7: Don’t Mess with Texas on Route 66
Post #8: Route 66 Texas Panhandle
Post #9: Bound for Tucumcari, New Mexico
Post #10: Santa Fe’ed Your Soul
Post #11: The Winds of Taos
Post #12: The Good, the Bad, and the Heinous of New Mexico
Post #13: Dusky, Durable Durango
Post #14: Cliff Dwellings of Mesa Verde Colorado
Post #15: Moab Rocks
This is Post #16: No Clever Title for Richfield, Utah
Post #17: Leavening Las Vegas

 

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